Episode 59: The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

It plays the episode from iTunes store or else it gets the hose once more as the guys talk Jonathan Demme’s 1991 film The Silence of the Lambs. They talk about what a classic film villain Hannibal Lecter is, and how successful the first installment of the film franchise is where one of the more iconic villains could really be second-billed behind the absolutely terrifying Buffalo Bill. There is some dissension in the ranks as some Bit Players feel the film is fully deserving of the uncanny Oscar sweep of the five major categories, while some find it to be typical horror cheese. One thing can be agreed upon: The Silence of the Lambs is creepy as hell.

Ep 59 The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
Director
Jonathan Demme
Stars
Anthony Hopkins, Jodie Foster, Lawrence A. Bonney

Curated by: Jarryd

4.4

Aired Wednesday, June 22, 2016

It plays the episode from iTunes store or else it gets the hose once more as the guys talk Jonathan Demme's 1991 film The Silence of the Lambs. They talk about what a classic film villain Hannibal Lecter is, and how successful the first installment of the film franchise is where one of the more iconic villains could really be second-billed behind the absolutely terrifying Buffalo Bill. There is some dissension in the ranks as some Bit Players feel the film is fully deserving of the uncanny Oscar sweep of the five major categories, while some find it to be typical horror cheese. One thing can be agreed upon: The Silence of the Lambs is creepy as hell.

Episode 56: Ocean’s Eleven (2001)

The guys round up the crew for one last job: Steven Soderbergh’s 2001 classic heist remake Ocean’s Eleven. The guys talk about how the film’s ‘coolness’ is perhaps its greatest strength, and how that coolness is mostly buoyed by its massive star power (that only seems to grow as time goes on). Despite the fact that it’s just a super cool film, Steven Soderbergh’s seemingly effortless directorial coolness is probably the real star at play here. Soderbergh proves once again that he makes films that make it seem easy to make films: almost as easy as the heist in the film itself. Speaking of heists, the guys plan their own theoretical heists and pick their perfect team of crooks.

Ocean's Eleven (2001)
Director
Steven Soderbergh
Stars
George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Julia Roberts, Andy Garcia, Casey Affleck, Don Cheadle, Elliott Gould, Bernie Mac

Curated by: Anders

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, May 25, 2016

The guys round up the crew for one last job: Steven Soderbergh's 2001 classic heist remake Ocean's Eleven. The guys talk about how the film's 'coolness' is perhaps its greatest strength, and how that coolness is mostly buoyed by its massive star power (that only seems to grow as time goes on). Despite the fact that it's just a super cool film, Steven Soderbergh's seemingly effortless directorial coolness is probably the real star at play here. Soderbergh proves once again that he makes films that make it seem easy to make films: almost as easy as the heist in the film itself. Speaking of heists, the guys plan their own theoretical heists and pick their perfect team of crooks.

Cruis’n World: The Firm (1993)

The guys are back to Cruis’n the World with Sydney Pollack’s 1993 legal thriller The Firm. They talk about what a bizarre film it truly is, probably saved only by some of Tom Cruise’s finest running sequences as he smokes a silken blonde baddie, Gene Hackman’s wonderfully phoned-in nuance, and the various ways to distinguish one John Grisham film from another. Despite all of the film’s obvious flaws, it features some amazing character performances from Holly Hunter and Gary Busey, and Lil’ Tommy is on top of his game, making it an essential piece of his filmography.

The Firm (1993)
Director
Sydney Pollack
Stars
Tom Cruise, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Gene Hackman, Hal Holbrook, Wilford Brimley, Holly Hunter, Gary Busey

Curated by: The Bit Players

3.2

Aired Monday, April 25, 2016

The guys are back to Cruis'n the World with Sydney Pollack's 1993 legal thriller The Firm. They talk about what a bizarre film it truly is, probably saved only by some of Tom Cruise's finest running sequences as he smokes a silken blonde baddie, Gene Hackman's wonderfully phoned-in nuance, and the various ways to distinguish one John Grisham film from another. Despite all of the film's obvious flaws, it features some amazing character performances from Holly Hunter and Gary Busey, and Lil' Tommy is on top of his game, making it an essential piece of his filmography.

Episode 51: The Untouchables (1987)

Listen here, see: the Bit Players are back to talk about Brian De Palma’s 1987 love letter to prohibition, The Untouchables. The guys break down Sean Connery’s Oscar-winning performance and his contractual accent forgiveness clause, how much better this movie could have been if its central character wasn’t its most one-dimensional, and the stunning visual beauty on which De Palma obviously labored very hard, completely forgetting to make an emotionally coherent movie. They also pick their own squad names and missions as well as try to cast the perfect modern-day Eliot Ness.

The Untouchables (1987)
Director
Brian De Palma
Stars
Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro, Andy Garcia

Curated By: Anders Oster

2.8

Aired Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Listen here, see: the Bit Players are back to talk about Brian De Palma's 1987 love letter to prohibition, The Untouchables. The guys break down Sean Connery's Oscar-winning performance and his contractual accent forgiveness clause, how much better this movie could have been if its central character wasn't its most one-dimensional, and the stunning visual beauty on which De Palma obviously labored very hard, completely forgetting to make an emotionally coherent movie. They also pick their own squad names and missions as well as try to cast the perfect modern-day Eliot Ness.

Episode 45: Falling Down (1993)

The guys finally snap and go postal this week on their episode of Joel Schumacher’s 1993 cult classic Falling Down. They compare the film with others like it that use heat as a device to show a character’s breaking point, celebrate the hilariously ’90s style of the film and its director, who is probably stuck back in 1996 and we don’t even know it, and just how this film has managed to garner such acclaim, when seemingly everything points to it being a bad movie. See where the guys themselves stand as well as their own vanity plate a la D-FENS and where they’d pick to retire.

Falling Down (1993)
Director
Joel Schumacher
Stars
Michael Douglas, Robert Duvall, Barbara Hershey

Curated by: Jeff

2.0

Aired Wednesday, March 9, 2016

The guys finally snap and go postal this week on their episode of Joel Schumacher's 1993 cult classic Falling Down. They compare the film with others like it that use heat as a device to show a character's breaking point, celebrate the hilariously '90s style of the film and its director, who is probably stuck back in 1996 and we don't even know it, and just how this film has managed to garner such acclaim, when seemingly everything points to it being a bad movie. See where the guys themselves stand as well as their own vanity plate a la D-FENS and where they'd pick to retire.

Episode 37: Fargo (1996)

The guys get their hands dirty with another Coen Brothers classic, the brilliant 1996 crime film Fargo, don’tchaknow? The film blurs the genre lines of comedy and drama with the shockingly brutal events that seemingly occur at random; it’s a screenwriting achievement in that the actual screenwriting is so well hidden by the wonderfully natural performances and amazing story craft. Fargo is a film that truly embodies the beauty of telling a story on screen, one that asks the viewer to appreciate the little things in life and maybe don’t try to kidnap their spouses. The guys also discuss New Year’s Resolutions and what their own paintings would be in a stamp contest.

Fargo (1996)
Directors
The Coen Brothers
Stars
Frances McDormand, William H. Macy, Steve Buscemi, Peter Stormare

Curated by: Jeff

5.0

What Movies Are About

Aired Friday, January 8, 2016

The guys get their hands dirty with another Coen Brothers classic, the brilliant 1996 crime film Fargo, don'tchaknow? The film blurs the genre lines of comedy and drama with the shockingly brutal events that seemingly occur at random; it's a screenwriting achievement in that the actual screenwriting is so well hidden by the wonderfully natural performances and amazing story craft. Fargo is a film that truly embodies the beauty of telling a story on screen, one that asks the viewer to appreciate the little things in life and maybe don't try to kidnap their spouses. The guys also discuss New Year's Resolutions and what their own paintings would be in a stamp contest.

Episode 10: Goodfellas (1990)

The guys are back from break to talk about Martin Scorsese’s 1990 classic mobster flick Goodfellas. The film blurs the lines between fact and fiction to the point where its real-life subject Henry Hill (played by, in the role of his lifetime, Ray Liotta) said it was almost 100% true. The guys break down the strange lure of Liotta and a career made on this role and roles like it as well as the twisted humor of the film’s most violent character, Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci) and the understated performance of Robert De Niro as Jimmy Conway. For all of the over-the-top violence and gangster grandiosity, the guys agree that the craziest part of the film is easily those actors playing 21- and 28-year old men, but the joy of the film isn’t affected. They also pick their own Wiseguy nicknames and prison jobs and discuss the vacations that kept them away for three weeks.

Goodfellas (1990)
Director
Martin Scorsese
Stars
Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci, Lorraine Bracco

Curated by: Anders

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Friday, June 12, 2015
The guys are back from break to talk about Martin Scorsese's 1990 classic mobster flick Goodfellas. The film blurs the lines between fact and fiction to the point where its real-life subject Henry Hill (played by, in the role of his lifetime, Ray Liotta) said it was almost 100% true. The guys break down the strange lure of Liotta and a career made on this role and roles like it as well as the twisted humor of the film's most violent character, Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci) and the understated performance of Robert De Niro as Jimmy Conway. For all of the over-the-top violence and gangster grandiosity, the guys agree that the craziest part of the film is easily those actors playing 21- and 28-year old men, but the joy of the film isn't affected. They also pick their own Wiseguy nicknames and prison jobs and discuss the vacations that kept them away for three weeks.