Episode 50: Kingsman: The Secret Service (2015)

It’s Oxfords, not brogues, this week as the guys suit up for the listener-selected 50th episode on Matthew Vaughn’s 2015 spy film Kingsman: The Secret Service. They talk about how what separates Kingsman from the rest of the pack is the fact that Colin Firth and company always defer to fun on the film, never taking itself or the spy genre too seriously, which actually makes it one of the spy films to take the most seriously. Once again the baffling time-resistance of Michael Caine is discussed as well as the guys picking their own Sun headline on the day they save the world.

Ep 50 Kingsman: The Secret Service (2015)
Director
Matthew Vaughn
Stars
Colin Firth
Samuel L. Jackson
Mark Strong
Taron Egerton
Michael Caine
Mark Hamill

Listener Selection

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, April 13, 2016

It's Oxfords, not brogues, this week as the guys suit up for the listener-selected 50th episode on Matthew Vaughn's 2015 spy film Kingsman: The Secret Service. They talk about how what separates Kingsman from the rest of the pack is the fact that Colin Firth and company always defer to fun on the film, never taking itself or the spy genre too seriously, which actually makes it one of the spy films to take the most seriously. Once again the baffling time-resistance of Michael Caine is discussed as well as the guys picking their own Sun headline on the day they save the world.

First Watch: Eddie the Eagle

If you see Eddie the Eagle in theaters make sure you wear your helmet because this film will uplift you straight through the ceiling. If what you’re looking for is new and inventive film-making, do not see this film. Go see The Revenant and stare in awe (but mostly cringe) for the better part of 2 1/2 hours. If what you’re looking for is inspiration, smiles, and giddiness, go see Eddie The Eagle. This film embraces the cliché and takes the tried and true approach to inspiration.

If you see Eddie the Eagle in theaters make sure you wear your helmet because this film will uplift you straight through the ceiling. If what you’re looking for is new and inventive film-making, do not see this film. Go see The Revenant and stare in awe (but mostly cringe) for the better part of 2 1/2 hours. If what you’re looking for is inspiration, smiles, and giddiness, go see Eddie The Eagle. This film embraces the cliché and takes the tried and true approach to inspiration. I would recommend this movie to anyone who’s not tired of how they felt after seeing Rocky, The Mighty Ducks, Chariots of Fire, Miracle, Hoosiers, Rudy, or Cool Runnings. These types of movies are the ones we’ve seen recently when we find ourselves on a late night run, eating unusual amounts of fruits and vegetables, or at the gym for the first time in years. They send shivers of excitement up our spines and reignite our most ludicrous dreams. Maybe it’s just me but I can’t get enough of these movies.

Eddie the Eagle tells us the true underdog story of Eddie Edwards, the phenomenally undertalented and remarkably British Olympic ski jumper portrayed by Taron Egerton. Born with the will of an Olympian but the body of a Muppet, Eddie has always dreamed of being an Olympic athlete. Every day of his childhood he pursues his hopeless goal with blinding optimism, the encouragement of his ever supportive mother, and the doubt of his less than supportive father. After nearly making the Olympic downhill skiing team Eddie is unfazed by failure and turns his gaze upward toward ski jumping, a sport for which the British do not have a team. Eddie decides to be that team. Through this he meets his trainer, a once-great ski jumper turned washed-up drunk played by Hugh Jackman.

The film’s director, Dexter Fletcher, mixes these clichéd characters with an age-old story and a D-grade sport and cooks himself up a powerful stew of a movie that will leave you soaring. This is feel good film at its finest. Fletcher does a great job of bringing you into the world of ski jumping and making you feel the fear and excitement of launching off these epic jumps. Egerton, after playing a super suave spy in Kingsman, shows his range and brings to life this incredibly quirky and dorky character. Jackman is amazing and super likeable as usual, the score is kinetic and uplifting, and there are a few scenes of absolute movie magic that embody the reason I love movies. Matthew Vaughn (Stardust, X-Men: First Class, Kingsman: The Secret Service, Kick-Ass) helped produce this movie and you can definitely see his fingerprints every so often. Eddie the Eagle will be on my re-watch list for years to come and hopefully on your soon-to-watch list starting now.