Episode 107: Carrie (1976)

The guys bust out the ruffled tuxedos and pig blood buckets for this week’s podcast on Brian De Palma’s 1976 Stephen King adaptation, Carrie. They talk about King’s affinity for over-the-top bullies — a group of which featured in Carrie among his most psychotic, fronted by John Travolta and Nancy Allen — the touching and incredibly acted performance from Sissy Spacek in the role of the title character, and the ways in which the film brings baddies from both within the home and without, a feature that continually pushes forth a very claustrophobic and caged-in representation of a high school girl being sent deeper into herself over the course of the film. Lucky for her, and pretty unlucky for just about everyone else — from her mother (Piper Laurie) to her prom date (William Katt) to the only authority figure to show any sort of compassion, despite beating the hell out of everyone else (Betty Buckley) — what Carrie finds when she ventures deeper inside of herself is a super-power. Not bad. It’s just too bad that an entire school of people had to die for Sue (Amy Irving) to learn her lesson about tampon-tossing.

Carrie (1976)
Director
Brian De Palma
Stars
Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, Amy Irving, William Katt, Betty Buckley, Nancy Allen, John Travolta

Selected By
Jeff

4.6

what movies are
About

Aired Monday, October 30, 2017

The guys bust out the ruffled tuxedos and pig blood buckets for this week's podcast on Brian De Palma's 1976 Stephen King adaptation, Carrie. They talk about King's affinity for over-the-top bullies — a group of which featured in Carrie among his most psychotic, fronted by John Travolta and Nancy Allen — the touching and incredibly acted performance from Sissy Spacek in the role of the title character, and the ways in which the film brings baddies from both within the home and without, a feature that continually pushes forth a very claustrophobic and caged-in representation of a high school girl being sent deeper into herself over the course of the film. Lucky for her, and pretty unlucky for just about everyone else — from her mother (Piper Laurie) to her prom date (William Katt) to the only authority figure to show any sort of compassion, despite beating the hell out of everyone else (Betty Buckley) — what Carrie finds when she ventures deeper inside of herself is a super-power. Not bad. It's just too bad that an entire school of people had to die for Sue (Amy Irving) to learn her lesson about tampon-tossing.

Featuring "I Never Dreamed Someone Like You Could Love Someone Like Me" by Pino Donaggio

03:00 Number-Crunching
12:20 Carrie Introduction
14:30 Stephen King's Affinity for Losers
18:00 Carrie vs. The Untouchables
20:50 Sissy Spacek's Performance/Carrie's Vulnerability
24:00 Seeing Carrie for the First Time
27:10 Why the Film and Novel Resonate
32:20 What are the Ingredients for Movie Magic?
36:00 Clark's Corner: Blu-Ray Combo Pack, Genre Game, Lestat-Approved?
41:30 Ratings

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Episode 62: The Shining (1980)

All work and no play makes the Bit Players dull boys as they return from hiatus to cover Stanley Kubrick’s classic horror flick, The Shining. Join the guys for a lovely hour getaway in the lovely room 237 at the Overlook Hotel, discussing Kubrick’s intensely honed-in vision and the way that vision, combined with having to work everyday alongside Jack Nicholson, just about destroyed Shelley Duvall, the allure of the scare in film, and all of the ridiculous theories that have spawned from the film due to its rather ambiguous nature.

The Shining (1980)
Director
Stanley Kubrick
Stars
Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lloyd

Selected By
Anders

4.6

what movies are
About

Aired Wednesday, July 27, 2016

All work and no play makes the Bit Players dull boys as they return from hiatus to cover Stanley Kubrick's classic horror flick, The Shining. Join the guys for a lovely hour getaway in the lovely room 237 at the Overlook Hotel, discussing Kubrick's intensely honed-in vision and the way that vision, combined with having to work everyday alongside Jack Nicholson, just about destroyed Shelley Duvall, the allure of the scare in film, and all of the ridiculous theories that have spawned from the film due to its rather ambiguous nature.