Episode 82: Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

Join the Bit Players on this week’s podcast for some crabby snacks and homemades as they talk about David O. Russell’s 2012 film Silver Linings Playbook, starring Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence. The guys break down how well the film handles mental illness through the rich humanization of its characters, how it stands as David O. Russell’s best work thanks to an amazing screenplay and performances from top to bottom, and how the fact that Chris Tucker doesn’t represent that bottom, but more of an upper middle, is probably what makes Silver Linings Playbook such a great watch.

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)
Director
David O. Russell
Stars
Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver, Chris Tucker

Curated by: Jarryd

5.0

What Movies Are About

Aired Monday, January 9, 2017

Join the Bit Players on this week's podcast for some crabby snacks and homemades as they talk about David O. Russell's 2012 film Silver Linings Playbook, starring Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence. The guys break down how well the film handles mental illness through the rich humanization of its characters, how it stands as David O. Russell's best work thanks to an amazing screenplay and performances from top to bottom, and how the fact that Chris Tucker doesn't represent that bottom, but more of an upper middle, is probably what makes Silver Linings Playbook such a great watch.

Episode 80: Casablanca (1942)

It’s the beginning of a beautiful friendship as the Bit Players talk about the iconic 1942 World War II film Casablanca on this week’s podcast. As with any film that has earned the reputation that Michael Curtiz’s film has, the guys look at it through a modern populist moviegoer’s perspective and see how it holds up to scrutiny. It’s a particularly interesting war movie in that it was released during the war itself, so they break down what, if any, implications the contemporary political landscape had on the film. Ultimately the guys look back at the film as favorably as possible, given the fact that they like Marvel movies and Casablanca is like a hundred years old and in black and white.

Casablanca (1942)
Director
Michael Curtiz
Stars
Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre

Curated by: Anders

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Monday, December 19, 2016

It's the beginning of a beautiful friendship as the Bit Players talk about the iconic 1942 World War II film Casablanca on this week's podcast. As with any film that has earned the reputation that Michael Curtiz's film has, the guys look at it through a modern populist moviegoer's perspective and see how it holds up to scrutiny. It's a particularly interesting war movie in that it was released during the war itself, so they break down what, if any, implications the contemporary political landscape had on the film. Ultimately the guys look back at the film as favorably as possible, given the fact that they like Marvel movies and Casablanca is like a hundred years old and in black and white.

Episode 76: North by Northwest (1959)

The guys go on a thrilling adventure across the country with their podcast on Alfred Hitchcock’s 1959 action classic, North by Northwest. They talk about the ways in which the pretty straightforward thriller seems to differ from the typically Hitchcockian methods of telling a story, with the iconic director famously telling the viewer not to look too deeply at North by Northwest and a deeper enjoyment should arise. The Bit Players break that down in comparing it to James Bond films, Hitchcock’s other, more cerebral work, and the level to which Cary Grant’s Golden Era Hollywood star power translates to the modern viewer. Much of the film’s discussion can be narrowed down to one simple point, however: when put up against Richie Rich, is North by Northwest the best film to climax on the domepiece of Abraham Lincoln?

North by Northwest (1959)
Director
Alfred Hitchcock
Stars
Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason

Curated by: Jeff

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Monday, November 7, 2016

The guys go on a thrilling adventure across the country with their podcast on Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 action classic, North by Northwest. They talk about the ways in which the pretty straightforward thriller seems to differ from the typically Hitchcockian methods of telling a story, with the iconic director famously telling the viewer not to look too deeply at North by Northwest and a deeper enjoyment should arise. The Bit Players break that down in comparing it to James Bond films, Hitchcock's other, more cerebral work, and the level to which Cary Grant's Golden Era Hollywood star power translates to the modern viewer. Much of the film's discussion can be narrowed down to one simple point, however: when put up against Richie Rich, is North by Northwest the best film to climax on the domepiece of Abraham Lincoln?

Episode 61: The Princess Bride (1987)

As you wish (or maybe as you didn’t wish at all, who can tell?), the Bit Players are here with a discussion on the 1987 Rob Reiner classic The Princess Bride. It’s a film we all know and love for its funloving, lighthearted take on not only fairy tales but the way fairy tales are told, and it is a straight-up nostalgia fest as the guys break down the film. They think about whether the film will continue to last in the canon and the reasons its stayed around this long, from the incredible cast to the sharp-witted dialogue.

The Princess Bride (1987)
Director
Rob Reiner
Stars
Robin Wright, Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin

Curated by: Jarryd

4.8

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, June 22, 2016

As you wish (or maybe as you didn't wish at all, who can tell?), the Bit Players are here with a discussion on the 1987 Rob Reiner classic The Princess Bride. It's a film we all know and love for its funloving, lighthearted take on not only fairy tales but the way fairy tales are told, and it is a straight-up nostalgia fest as the guys break down the film. They think about whether the film will continue to last in the canon and the reasons its stayed around this long, from the incredible cast to the sharp-witted dialogue.

Episode 60: Romancing the Stone (1984)

It’s a grand adventure to the wilds of Colombia as the guys break down the 1984 oft-forgotten gem of a film Romancing the Stone. The film got somewhat lost in the mix of treasure hunt films amongst the Indiana Jones series, but there is plenty of fun to be had with Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas’s lighthearted romp through the jungle. The guys talk about how Colombian cops are ruthless, how alligators aren’t used as weapons nearly enough, and how Douglas might have the reverse Midas touch.

Romancing the Stone (1984)
Director
Robert Zemeckis
Stars
Kathleen Turner, Michael Douglas, Danny DeVito

Curated by: Clark

2.6

Aired Wednesday, June 29, 2016

It's a grand adventure to the wilds of Colombia as the guys break down the 1984 oft-forgotten gem of a film Romancing the Stone. The film got somewhat lost in the mix of treasure hunt films amongst the Indiana Jones series, but there is plenty of fun to be had with Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas's lighthearted romp through the jungle. The guys talk about how Colombian cops are ruthless, how alligators aren't used as weapons nearly enough, and how Douglas might have the reverse Midas touch.

Episode 52: Breathless (1960)

The guys take a trip back in time to 1960s Paris, France for the French New Wave classic Breathless, directed by Jean-Luc Godard. They address the context that surrounds the film and how that context might influence modern perceptions as well as how those modern perceptions might hurt or help viewings. They also discuss the film’s relationship between Patricia (BAFTA-Nominated Jean Seberg) and Michel (Jean-Paul Belmondo) feels as if it buzzes with life given the off-the-cuff dialogue and hand-held film style. They also pick the one question they’d ask an author of their choice (as Patricia does in the film) and a movie star they’d like to emulate like Michel and Humphrey Bogart.

Breathless (1960)
Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Stars
Jean Seberg, Jean-Paul Belmondo

Curated By: Jeff

4.0

Aired Wednesday, April 27, 2016

The guys take a trip back in time to 1960s Paris, France for the French New Wave classic Breathless, directed by Jean-Luc Godard. They address the context that surrounds the film and how that context might influence modern perceptions as well as how those modern perceptions might hurt or help viewings. They also discuss the film's relationship between Patricia (BAFTA-Nominated Jean Seberg) and Michel (Jean-Paul Belmondo) feels as if it buzzes with life given the off-the-cuff dialogue and hand-held film style. They also pick the one question they'd ask an author of their choice (as Patricia does in the film) and a movie star they'd like to emulate like Michel and Humphrey Bogart.

Episode 46: Broadcast News (1987)

5, 4, 3, 2…(points), the guys are taking to the news room this week for their episode on James L. Brooks’s 1987 film Broadcast News. They talk about the way the film can be taken in one of two ways, as a poignant examination of the ongoing state of network news casting, an expansion and continuation of the spirit of Network, or more of a character study based around the working lives of its three main characters. Either way you slice it, however, Broadcast News is a classic, and what movies are about.

Broadcast News (1987)
Director
James L. Brooks
Stars
William Hurt, Holly Hunter, Albert Brooks

Curated by: Jarryd

5.0

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, March 16, 2016

5, 4, 3, 2...(points), the guys are taking to the news room this week for their episode on James L. Brooks's 1987 film Broadcast News. They talk about the way the film can be taken in one of two ways, as a poignant examination of the ongoing state of network news casting, an expansion and continuation of the spirit of Network, or more of a character study based around the working lives of its three main characters. Either way you slice it, however, Broadcast News is a classic, and what movies are about.

Episode 44: 10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

The guys go back to their high school halls with the 1999 romantic comedy 10 Things I Hate About You. They talk about the great performances from the surprisingly robust cast of Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Heath Ledger, the D-Lister with the A-List name Julia Stiles, Alex Mack, and Oscar Isaac’s doppelganger, just what it is about a fairly formulaic film that makes it stand out above other high school rom-coms of its day, and how Pavement songs might have made it better. They also go down memory lane and pick their favorite high school teachers and the most elaborate things they ever did for (or to) a girl.

10 Things I Hate About You (1999)
Director
Gil Junger
Stars
Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Julia Stiles, Heath Ledger, Larisa Oleynik, David Krumholtz, Gabrielle Union, Larry Miller

Curated by: Brian

3.0

Aired Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The guys go back to their high school halls with the 1999 romantic comedy 10 Things I Hate About You. They talk about the great performances from the surprisingly robust cast of Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Heath Ledger, the D-Lister with the A-List name Julia Stiles, Alex Mack, and Oscar Isaac's doppelganger, just what it is about a fairly formulaic film that makes it stand out above other high school rom-coms of its day, and how Pavement songs might have made it better. They also go down memory lane and pick their favorite high school teachers and the most elaborate things they ever did for (or to) a girl.

Episode 41: Groundhog Day (1993)

Listen to this week’s episode to see if the guys see their shadows as they discuss Harold Ramis’s 1993 hit Groundhog Day. Bill Murray’s electric presence takes a film that, on paper, should never have been elevated above a regular nineties rom-com to a place that very few movies reach: absolute perfection. Groundhog Day combines stunningly thought-provoking philosophy with belly laughs and touching moments to create a film that will always stand the test of time. The guys also discuss what they’d do with an endless day in Punxsutawney as well as a day they’d like to relive over and over.

Groundhog Day (1993)
Directors
Harold Ramis
Stars
Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott

Curated by: Clark

4.8

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Listen to this week's episode to see if the guys see their shadows as they discuss Harold Ramis's 1993 hit Groundhog Day. Bill Murray's electric presence takes a film that, on paper, should never have been elevated above a regular nineties rom-com to a place that very few movies reach: absolute perfection. Groundhog Day combines stunningly thought-provoking philosophy with belly laughs and touching moments to create a film that will always stand the test of time. The guys also discuss what they'd do with an endless day in Punxsutawney as well as a day they'd like to relive over and over.

Episode 19: Lost in Translation (2003)

In this week’s episode, the guys talk Sofia Coppola’s 2003 film Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. The film follows two Americans disenchanted and alone in Tokyo who find peace and even love within each other, though they are an unlikely pair. The episode becomes a discussion of love and intimacy and what makes the relationship between Bob (Murray) and Charlotte (Johansson) so beautiful and believable. Coppola’s film thrives in the realm of the real through actually quite dreamlike tones and cinematography, highlighting the way a once-in-a-lifetime relationship like Bob’s and Charlotte’s can float by surreally. They also talk about where in the world they’d like to get “lost” and their go-to karaoke songs.

Lost in Translation (2003)
Director
Sofia Coppola
Stars
Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Giovanni Ribisi, Anna Faris

Curated by: Jeff

4.4

Aired Friday, August 14, 2015

In this week's episode, the guys talk Sofia Coppola's 2003 film Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. The film follows two Americans disenchanted and alone in Tokyo who find peace and even love within each other, though they are an unlikely pair. The episode becomes a discussion of love and intimacy and what makes the relationship between Bob (Murray) and Charlotte (Johansson) so beautiful and believable. Coppola's film thrives in the realm of the real through actually quite dreamlike tones and cinematography, highlighting the way a once-in-a-lifetime relationship like Bob's and Charlotte's can float by surreally. They also talk about where in the world they'd like to get "lost" and their go-to karaoke songs.