Episode 23: Big Fish (2003)

This week the guys talk about Tim Burton’s 2003 film Big Fish, starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Marion Cotillard, and Jessica Lange. They discuss the ways that the film is both a major departure for Burton, given its levity and general colorful nature, but that there’s a thread of darkness that truly feels like his thumbprint on the family-oriented fantasy film. Big Fish plays on memory and storytelling and the ways that our minds take stories and twist them into fantasies over time in a way that actually blurs the line between what’s real and what’s not. They talk about how those new and interesting elements for Burton’s films mix with the familiar faces like Helena Bonham Carter and Danny DeVito to become one of his best films ever. They also look into the witch’s eye to see how they might go in the end and what their own “big fish” might be.

Big Fish (2003)
Director
Tim Burton
Stars
Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup

Curated by: Brian

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Tuesday, September 22, 2015

This week the guys talk about Tim Burton's 2003 film Big Fish, starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Marion Cotillard, and Jessica Lange. They discuss the ways that the film is both a major departure for Burton, given its levity and general colorful nature, but that there's a thread of darkness that truly feels like his thumbprint on the family-oriented fantasy film. Big Fish plays on memory and storytelling and the ways that our minds take stories and twist them into fantasies over time in a way that actually blurs the line between what's real and what's not. They talk about how those new and interesting elements for Burton's films mix with the familiar faces like Helena Bonham Carter and Danny DeVito to become one of his best films ever. They also look into the witch's eye to see how they might go in the end and what their own "big fish" might be.

This week's episode is brought to you by Oreos.

Best Female Performances | The Best of 2014

Since we just missed the cutoff of launching the Bit Players at the end of last year, we wanted to post what we considered to be our year-end roundup of 2014 in film. There were tons of amazing films and performances to choose from, and it was hard to narrow down to a consensus, but we managed to do that by the end. Inside you will find the best films, best male performances, best female performances, best directors, most overrated films, most underrated films, worst films, and the best scenes of the year, as well as our individual ballots if you want to see where all of these selections came from. Enjoy, and we look forward to a great year of watching film together along with you in 2015.

Since we just missed the cutoff of launching the Bit Players at the end of last year, we wanted to post what we considered to be our year-end roundup of 2014 in film. There were tons of amazing films and performances to choose from, and it was hard to narrow down to a consensus, but we managed to do that by the end. Inside you will find the best films, best male performances, best female performances, best directors, most overrated films, most underrated films, worst films, and the best scenes of the year, as well as our individual ballots if you want to see where all of these selections came from. Enjoy, and we look forward to a great year of watching film together along with you in 2015.

Julianne Moore
5. Julianne Moore
Still Alice
Alice Howland

I traded Julianne Moore to Clark for James McAvoy before this year’s draft. I won’t say it’s the worst decision I’ve ever made (I now have Professor X and Magneto on my team) but it certainly wasn’t the best. She is the closest thing we have to Meryl Streep which can be seen in Still Alice. She portrays a brilliant college professor going through various stages of Alzheimer’s disease. It is hard to watch. Good movie, but a great performance. – Anders Oster

Felicity Jones
4. Felicity Jones
The Theory of Everything
Jane Hawking

I know all the talk from the Theory of Everything was on Eddie Redmayne and his portrayal of Stephen Hawking, and that performance should, of course, be commended. However, this is really Jane Hawking’s story to tell, her book to adapt, her side of the struggle just as much as his, and Felicity Jones plays the part absolutely beautifully. She takes the feelings of love and fear and desperation that must come with seeing one’s significant other physically deteriorate and her portrayal of Jane is just as breathtaking as Redmayne’s; perhaps it went overlooked due to the subtle nature with which it’s performed, rather than the necessarily physical and spotlighted work that must be done for Stephen, but my eyes went to Jones just as much as they did to Redmayne to see her side of the story. – Jeff Pearson

Emma Stone
3. Emma Stone
Birdman: Or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Sam Thomson

In a film packed with superstars shining bright, Emma stands out. We all loved her before this movie, but here, she showed some true range and ability. It will be exciting to see what the future entails. – Jarryd Baxter

Marion Cotillard
2. Marion Cotillard
Two Days, One Night
Sandra

Essie Davis
1. Essie Davis
The Babadook
Amelia

The Babadook was a great film because Essie Davis played a troubled woman in such a refined way that even after multiple viewings her character still has more to reveal. – Clark Carmichael
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