Episode 96: Boogie Nights (1997)

The guys head to the grimy cesspool known as San Fernando Valley for this week’s podcast on Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1997 film, Boogie Nights. They talk about the film in relation to the rest of PTA’s work, how it stands out in establishing a bonafide modern-day auteur, and the crazy array of talented actors that make up the lovable band of dick-swangin’ buddies. They also discuss who would be able to reshape this classic if it were to be remade, which actually turned out way easier than you’d think.

Boogie Nights (1997)
Director
Paul Thomas Anderson
Stars
Mark Wahlberg, Burt Reynolds, Julianne Moore, Heather Graham, William H. Macy, Luis Guzmán, Don Cheadle, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, John C. Reilly

Curated by: The Bit Players

5.0

What Movies Are About

Aired Monday, August 14, 2017

The guys head to the grimy cesspool known as San Fernando Valley for this week's podcast on Paul Thomas Anderson's 1997 film, Boogie Nights. They talk about the film in relation to the rest of PTA's work, how it stands out in establishing a bonafide modern-day auteur, and the crazy array of talented actors that make up the lovable band of dick-swangin' buddies. They also discuss who would be able to reshape this classic if it were to be remade, which actually turned out way easier than you'd think.

Episode 56: Ocean’s Eleven (2001)

The guys round up the crew for one last job: Steven Soderbergh’s 2001 classic heist remake Ocean’s Eleven. The guys talk about how the film’s ‘coolness’ is perhaps its greatest strength, and how that coolness is mostly buoyed by its massive star power (that only seems to grow as time goes on). Despite the fact that it’s just a super cool film, Steven Soderbergh’s seemingly effortless directorial coolness is probably the real star at play here. Soderbergh proves once again that he makes films that make it seem easy to make films: almost as easy as the heist in the film itself. Speaking of heists, the guys plan their own theoretical heists and pick their perfect team of crooks.

Ocean's Eleven (2001)
Director
Steven Soderbergh
Stars
George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Julia Roberts, Andy Garcia, Casey Affleck, Don Cheadle, Elliott Gould, Bernie Mac

Curated by: Anders

4.6

What Movies Are About

Aired Wednesday, May 25, 2016

The guys round up the crew for one last job: Steven Soderbergh's 2001 classic heist remake Ocean's Eleven. The guys talk about how the film's 'coolness' is perhaps its greatest strength, and how that coolness is mostly buoyed by its massive star power (that only seems to grow as time goes on). Despite the fact that it's just a super cool film, Steven Soderbergh's seemingly effortless directorial coolness is probably the real star at play here. Soderbergh proves once again that he makes films that make it seem easy to make films: almost as easy as the heist in the film itself. Speaking of heists, the guys plan their own theoretical heists and pick their perfect team of crooks.

Midnight Showing: Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Back to the Marvel Cinematic Universe we go with the latest and greatest installment, Captain America: Civil War. The guys talk about how the film succeeds in ways that DC’s foil from this year Batman v Superman failed, how it takes just a little (and a lot of mega-stars) to make a great superhero flick, and perhaps the film’s greatest asset: its characters. Civil War introduces many new faces to the fray, but they feel utterly at home by film’s end, and it goes to show how devoting a little time to characterization can go a very, very long way.

Captain America: Civil War (2016)
Directors
The Russo Brothers
Stars
Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Don Cheadle, Jeremy Renner, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Bettany, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Rudd, Daniel Brühl

Curated by: The Bit Players

4.8

What Movies Are About

Aired Friday, May 13, 2016

Back to the Marvel Cinematic Universe we go with the latest and greatest installment, Captain America: Civil War. The guys talk about how the film succeeds in ways that DC's foil from this year Batman v Superman failed, how it takes just a little (and a lot of mega-stars) to make a great superhero flick, and perhaps the film's greatest asset: its characters. Civil War introduces many new faces to the fray, but they feel utterly at home by film's end, and it goes to show how devoting a little time to characterization can go a very, very long way.